Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Red Grapes and Pine Nuts

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Antioxidants, fiber (or should I spell it “fibre” just to shake things up a bit), vitamins and minerals galore, toasty, crunchy, and pops of sweet.

Top with crumbled bacon if you would like, or better yet, serve with sausage.  It’s especially good with Italian style sausage, and if you’ve never had sausages and grapes for supper, then you’re missing out.

The only thing this picture is missing is the sprouts and the pine nuts!

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Brussels Sprouts are a variety of cabbage that grows on a stalk, and the sprout itself is actually a “bud”, like a flower bud.  They’re not “baby cabbages” like I once thought, but an actual type that originally came from the Mediterranean region and then moved north through Europe.

One cup of these sprouts has 120% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C.  And you know what my favorite dessert is to have after this meal?

A couple of mandarin oranges.  More Vitamin C.  And the other part of a good dessert?  The almost forgotten and lesser known Vitamin C – Conversation.  

This entire meal can be on the table in about 30 minutes, leaving plenty of time to enjoy each others company.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Red Grapes and Pine Nuts

1/2 pound Brussels Sprouts, sliced in 1/2 lengthwise through the core

olive oil

salt, pepper, garlic powder, red pepper flakes

1/2 C red grapes, sliced in 1/2

2 t pine nuts

Iron skillet

Preheat oven to 400F.  In a small mixing bowl, drizzle some olive oil over the sprouts and add in the seasonings.  I don’t measure.  Mix to make sure everything is coated and then put into your skillet.  Don’t crowd them too much or they’ll steam instead of roast.  Set timer for 15 minutes.

Take out pan and flip the sprouts.  Add the grapes and nuts to the pan.  Return to oven for 5 minutes.

Transfer to plate immediately so those little nuts don’t get too brown!  Top with bacon, or some additional salt and pepper and a drizzle of good olive oil.

 

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Panzarotti (small hand held deep fried calzone)

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In a village called Monteroni d’Arbia , in the heart of Tuscany (Toscana), was a gem of a restaurant.

It was my first visit to Italy and I was looking for a place that was focused on farm to table food, and locally made items.

In this restaurant I was served something called panzarotti.  It had cheese and tomatoes in a fried crust.

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It’s a specialty of an area outside of Tuscany called Puglia (Apulia).  However, Naples also claims to be the birthplace of panzarotti.

What is interesting, is that in a small city in Wisconsin, there is a restaurant that has been serving something very similar called a “Ponza Rotta”, since 1976. It’s the same thing, only this version is HUGE.  Barely fits on a plate huge.  For a long time, it was the only place you could find it in the US.  And for a long time, no one knew the history of it.  Now, they are served at many places and even New Jersey claims to be the birthplace of these delectable treats.

If places around the world argue over who invented something, you have to believe that they are good!  Wherever they came from, or whomever came up with the idea, they were pretty genius in my humble opinion.

This crust recipe came from the blog thesweetworldsite.com where she asked that I try her calzone recipe.  This is an awesome dough, and I’ll be using it from now on.

My heart to yours,

Christina

Panzerotti

3 cups flour

pinch of salt

1/2 C warm water ( I used a PH of almost 9.  Water makes a difference)

1 1/2 t yeast

1 t sugar

extra warm water if needed

2 14.5 oz cans fire roasted tomatoes diced and drained of liquid

2 C shredded mozzarella  (I actually used a mix of mozzarella and provolone.  If you are using a fresh mozz, make sure to drain it very very well)

2 t Italian seasoning

grapeseed oil

Food processor

Mix the dried yeast and sugar and warm up your water.  Pour the water into your yeast sugar mix.  Let sit for a while.  Everyone says 5 minutes.

In your food processor, mix together 3 cups of flour and a “pinch” of salt.  I used sea salt, and the pinch is probably 1/4 t as I did it. Pulse.

Slowly pour the yeast water mixture into the flour. Keep pulsing.  Add more warm water as needed to make the ball. I ended up using about 3/4 C in total. It will form a ball all by itself. Take it out and pat it.  It should feel like a bay butt.  Sprinkle with water, cover it with a cotton dishcloth, and put in a warm place to rise for about an hour or so.

Take your cans of fireroasted tomatoes and pour them out in a collandar that you set over a bowl to catch the juices.  Stir them and let them drain.  Once they are drained, chop them up into little pieces. Drain again, and put into a bowl.  Mix in the cheese and seasonings.

Take your dough out and pat it down. Loosely stretch it into a log. Cut in 1/2, and then form 2 balls.  You don’t have to knead. After forming the 2 balls, stretch each one into a log and divide each log into 8 pieces.  Form a little dough ball with each piece, sprinkle with water, and cover to let rise a second time.  They should double in size.  Take them out again, pat them down, and reform the ball.  At this time, the dough will be firm enough to really handle that high temperature. Roll it out into a circle.  These end up being somewhere between 5 and 5 1/2 inches round.

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Fill with 1 1/2 – 2 T tomato and cheese mixture.  Honestly, you could put whatever pizza filling you wanted in there.  Fold the it over and pinch the ends so that it stays together.  Once they are done, I put them in the refrigerator to wait while the oil heats up.

Heat up your oil in a dutch oven.  It’s ready when you put the handle of a wooden spoon into the oil and it starts to bubble up and then the bubbles race away from the handle.

Gently lay one of the pastries into the oil.  Once it floats to the surface, add your next pastry.  Then, when that one hits the surface, add the next one.  As they start to brown, flip them over and continue to cook.  These go very fast – most of them took only around 3 minutes, but some took a bit longer. Remove them from the oil, and let them drain on a wire rack.  Sprinkle with salt.

Someone is going to try this recipe with an airfryer, so we’ll see how that works!  They are not very oily to begin with, but I’m curious to see if this crust will work with that cooking method!

 

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Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

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