Easiest Ever Creamed Corn (cream of corn)

IMG_7930

Tastes just like it came out of a can!

Contains no cream!

Takes less than 5 minutes to prepare!

If you live in Italy, it is nigh next to impossible to make many iconic American classics without getting a little creative in the kitchen.  They simply don’t have the base ingredients available at the grocery store.

One of those ingredients is creamed corn, or as some people call it, cream of corn.  To make it from fresh sweet corn, right off the cob, you take off the corn kernels, and then scrape the cob to get out all the milky residue.  You add some water and corn starch to the mixture, and heat it in a pan to thicken. The process to get out the milky liquid is why it’s called “creamed” corn, even though it has no actual milk products in it.

You can also make it with a can of sweet corn.  Simple, easy, delicious, and quick.

This recipe uses a can of sweet corn bought at the spesa (grocery store).  It was the largest can they had available when I was there, and the contents are, of course, in grams, not ounces.  But it is just a little over 1 Cup of corn, and about 1/4 Cup of water, and makes 2 small servings.

Easiest Ever Creamed Corn

1 300 g can of corn

1/4 C water

1/2 T corn starch (amido di maize) + 1/2 T cold water to make a slurry

Put 1/2 the can of corn, including water, in a small food processor.  Grind just until it looks like a yellow corn batter.  Add the remaining corn, and pulse a few times until it’s the consistency you want, leaving some kernels whole.

Pour into pan, and add about 1/4 cup water.  Put the heat on medium low, stir in your slurry, and bring up just to a boil.  Make sure to stir so nothing sticks.

Walah!  No sugar, no butter, no added salt, no nothing.  If you DO happen to get a can of corn that is not that sweet naturally, then by all means add a pinch of sugar if you would like – and next time buy a different brand to see if it’s sweeter.

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

 

Farinata (Chickpea flour flatbread)

IMG_7838

Farinata or Italian chickpea cake is a simple and easy to make dish that originated in the region of Liguria along the western Italian coast.  Legend has it, that sailors returning to the maritime city of Genoa after a battle with the city of Pisa (yes, I know…Pisa is part of Italy.  Italian history is full of big battles between cities) had bags of chickpea flour tip over, the flour mixed with sea water, then they baked it into a cake to celebrate their victory.

Today it is a popular street food, and although not as well known outside of Italy as the infinitely more famous pesto, it is definitely worth a try in any kitchen.

Did you see how fancy I made mine?

This is not typical.  I just did that because it was fun, and it looks amazing.  The typical dish uses only black pepper cracked over the top.

Regardless of how you make it – plain or dressed up, this naturally gluten free and vegan dish is high in soluble fiber which aids in digestion as well as keeping your arteries clean and clog free.  It’s crispy exterior and slightly creamy interior hold up well for mopping up sauces, and it’s the perfect foil for a little bit of artistic flair to keep the supper interesting!

I served it alongside chicken breast stuffed with artichoke and sundried tomato in a garlic cream sauce.  Fresh green beans, just lightly steamed provided a bit of crunch and the play on textures meant that we pretty much ate everything.  Only a small bit was saved for lunch tomorrow.

And although farinata is most tasty when just pulled out of the screaming hot oven, that is not by any means the only way that Italians eat it.  Most buy it from the store, and eat it at room temperature.

If you can’t find the flour in your regular flour aisle at the grocery store, try the gluten free section or head to the nearest natural foods store to find it.  Add the flour to your regular pancake recipe or bread recipe to increase the nutrition and lower the blood sugar spikes from regular wheat flour, or even add it to your cake mix to do the same thing.

*note – you have to soak the chickpea flour for at least 2 hours so it cooks evenly.  Don’t have 2 hours to wait?  Mix it in the morning and let it sit all day until supper time.  The soaking is important 🙂

Farinata (Italian chickpea flatbread)

You will need: a cast iron pan, and a bowel and whisk for mixing

1 1/2 cups chickpea flour

1 1/2 cups lukewarm water

1 teaspoon salt

3 Tablespoons olive oil plus more for the pan

Whisk flour and lukewarm water together in a bowl, cover, and let sit for at least 2 hours.  It can become foamy, and legend has it, that those bubbles can also cause bubbles in the digestive system (if you catch my drift.  haha, get it? ), so just use a spoon or ladle to skim off the foam after it soaks.

Preheat oven to about 500 F, and place the rack on the second level down from the top.  Heat the cast iron pan on stovetop over medium heat.

Once the pan is hot, pour in enough olive oil to fully coat the bottom, don’t be stingy.  Swirl the oil around.  It should start to smoke immediately.  Pour in the batter, take off the heat and place in the oven.

Because I put topping on mine, I set the timer for 15 minutes, take it out, and then arrange the toppings.  The pan is so hot that it will continue to cook the bottom even when the cake is out of the oven.  Brush the veggies with oil, and put back in the oven for another 10-15 minutes or until the veggies are done and the cake is nicely brown.

USE GOOD OVEN MITTS – IT’S REALLY HOT!

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

Warm Beet and Tomato Salad

IMG_7110

Cold and flu season have arrived once again…and I’m craving beets.  Not chicken soup, but beets.

This recipe is a simple adaption from an old time home remedy for flu.  Instead of juicing and steeping the raw ingredients into a tonic that is drunk several times a day, they are assembled into a very tasty salad that can be eaten hot, at room temperature, as a main dish or as a side salad.

It cookes up in only 15 minutes, and preparation time is quick and easy if you purchase pre-cooked organic beets from the natural foods section.

Warm Beet and Tomato Salad

Preheat oven to 375 F

2 large pre-cooked beets cut in 1 inch cubes

1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced

1/2 lb small tomatoes, cut in 1/2 or thick sliced

1/2 t pink salt

1/2 t sugar

1/4 t ground black pepper

1/2 t dried mint

sunflower oil

fresh squeezed lemon juice for finishing

 

Combine all ingredients except lemon juice, and cook in a glass dish for 12-15 minutes or until the tomatoes begin to break down.  Remove from heat, squeeze the lemon over the top and stir.  Top with a little more dried mint and serve!

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

Marinated Cauliflower with Quick and Easy Miso Peanut Sauce

IMG_3475

That nice little bit of caramelization on the cauliflower comes from agave syrup.  You can get the same color by using a natural, unrefined sugar.  The agave was used in this recipe so there would be a bit of “sticky” to the cauliflower.

Agave syrup is not necessarily healthier for you – it’s quite processed and pretty high in calories.  It does however, handle the heat of a sear quite well without turning black and bitter like a sugar sometimes can.  It’s more similar to a corn syrup than a sugar when you add it to a sauce.

What is my favorite way to steam vegetables?  Well…this handy bamboo steamer is my absolute favorite way.  The taste is so clean and fresh.  Each compartment can hold a different vegetable, and even if you’re using them them together in a recipe, they retain their own unique flavor profile.

IMG_3486

Marinated Cauliflower with Quick and Easy Miso Peanut Sauce

1 head cauliflower, cut into florets and steamed

1 inch piece fresh ginger, grated

1 inch piece fresh turmeric, grated

3 cloves roasted garlic, mashed

1 t ground cumin

1 t ground mustard (why mustard?  Because cooking cauliflower and broccoli can unfortunately make some of their strongest nutritional benefits less available to your body.  Adding mustard or radish to the cooked vegetables will then provide the nutrients necessary to ‘unlock’ their potential.  If you eat these vegetables raw, then you get the full benefits)

1 dried hot Chinese or Thai pepper (whole)

1/2 C Braggs Amino Acids or Soy Sauce

2 T Agave Syrup

Quick and Easy Miso Peanut Sauce

1 C peanut butter (I did not use a “peanuts only” brand, because it doesn’t melt as well for this quick and easy version).  

1 t garlic powder

1 t dried minced onion

1/4 t powdered dried ginger

1 C miso broth (I used a very yummy natto miso brand, but you can use other types of miso broth as well. )

*optional* honey to taste

Whisk all the marinade ingredients together and pour over the steamed cauliflower.  Massage the marinade into the cauliflower and let sit overnight in the refrigerator.  To serve, heat a pan to medium and add a bit of oil so the cauliflower doesn’t stick.  Remove cauliflower from marinade and sear both sides.

For the peanut sauce, briefly heat the spices in the bottom of a pot, and then pour your water in.  Follow your miso directions.

Whisk the miso broth bit by bit into the peanut butter until the peanut butter is melted and it’s at the consistency you want.

I like this marinated cauliflower and peanut sauce best when served over mung bean noodles and a bunch of steamed vegetables like carrots and zucchini!

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

 

 

 

Balsamic Roasted Chicken Breast

IMG_1379

I’m not joking, this was a 1.19 pound chicken breast.  That’s HUGE.  That’s a little over 1/2 kilo.

I used to make this fairly often several years ago, and it’s a great marinade!  If you can get your hands on a whole, cut up chicken, it makes a beautiful meal for a family and looks really stunning on a platter.  Add some mashed cauliflower to soak up the sauce, and a nice, simple salad of greens and tomato, and you’ll have a dish that “probably” won’t have any leftovers.  But if you DO have some leftover chicken, it makes an awesome topping for a salad the next day.

*tip – when using balsamic vinegar as a marinade, you do not need to use your most expensive bottle.  Save that for use as a salad dressing or drizzled over vegetables.*

Balsamic Marinade

1/4 C Balsamic Vinegar

2 T olive oil

2 T Dijon Mustard

2 T lemon juice

1 t minced garlic

1 t minced onion

1 t dried rosemary

1 t honey

pinch salt, pinch pepper, pinch hot pepper, pinch beet powder

After it cooks:  1/4 C hot chicken broth with splash of lemon juice

Preheat oven to 400 F

Whisk the marinade together and pour over the chicken breast.  I like to use a resealable kitchen storage bag, which I wash and reuse.  Marinate for at least an hour, but it’s even nicer to do it overnight.  Remove from bag and let excess marinade drip off.  Place the chicken breast, skin side up on a rack over a roasting pan.  Cook for approximately 35 minutes, brushing once during the cooking with the reserved marinade.  Remove from oven and put on a dish under a tent of aluminum foil while you prepare the sauce.

Put the roasting pan on top of the burner (make sure you are using a pan that is both oven and stove top safe!) Turn the burner to medium and pour the chicken broth into the pan.  Use a wooden spoon to scrape up all of the drippings from the pan.  Cook over medium heat until reduced by about 1/3.  Add a splash of lemon juice.  Remove from burner, pour over the chicken and serve!  This is an excellent marinade for a whole chicken as well!  Increase the cooking times by 5 minutes for the rest of the chicken (thighs, wings, legs, etc).

 

Herbes de Provence Cod

IMG_1367

It has been a while since I have posted.  There are a lot of reasons why, but if I have to look deeply at myself, a big part of it is because I thought:

What I ate is not post worthy

I’m experimenting a lot, and the recipes are good, but

Not post worthy

People like what I cooked, say they love it, but can it be replicated?  Can anyone do it?  Anywhere?

Not worthy

Wow.

Psalm 139:14 says

I will praise you; for I am fearfully (gloriously) and wonderfully made: marvelous are thy works; and THAT my soul knoweth right well.

That’s US.  Who we are, when we agree with who God says we are.

So today, I made some fish.  And it was good. So I’m posting it.  Not because it’s fancy, takes a lot of technique, or ticks any of the current dietary things, or is post worthy, but because it was good, and after eating it, I FELT good, and a cloud lifted from my brain.

Not only that, but afterwards I ate the leftovers of a recipe I was working on that is the

PERFECT DESSERT for this meal.  I’m so excited again to work on that one, because somehow, in the days when I couldn’t figure out what to post…it was all coming together in a glorious and wonderful way.  A little bit of research showed, that when you put certain foods together, you actually assimilate all of the nutrients and AMP UP the nutritional value.

Seriously?

It’s true!

The dessert that I have been working on is super good, and fits completely with the fish I made tonight, it just needs a few tweaks and twiggles.  I made up the word twiggles but feel free to use it.

This recipe is for ONE.  Just multiply the ingredients if someone else is eating with you.

You start by laying very thinly sliced potatoes, carrots, and a little bit of onion in a cast iron pan that was heated to med low, and had a small amount of olive oil spread on the bottom.  I salted all the veg except the onion, and let the liquids come out.  Then rinsed them and patted them dry before putting them in the pan.  Some of the starch will come out of the potatoes.

IMG_1360(2)

Then I laid the cod on top of the potatoes.  The cod was seasoned with garlic, herbes de provence, olive oil, and some pink salt.  I topped it with some thin sliced lemon, and drizzled some more olive oil over it all.

IMG_1361

After 10 minutes in a 350 F oven, I took it out and stirred up all the vegetables around the fish.

IMG_1363

Another 10 minutes in the oven, take out, stir the vegetables again, and cover in tin foil.  It should sit for at least 5 minutes covered by the foil tent.

I’ll do the first picture again, because all I do many times is top with a chiffonade of lettuce.  Even if it’s not just you eating, it’s fun to set out salt and pepper that has to be ground, and some olive oil.  That way everyone gets interactive with the food, even if someone else cooked it. There is always going to be someone who wants to put some hot pepper on it, so put that out also.  Anyway, have fun!

IMG_1367

Herbes de Provence Cod

1 piece cod approx 6 oz (I used a frozen at sea piece)

2 T good olive oil

1 T Herbes de Provence ( I used a blend from a place called gaec le frigoulet – but I can’t find a website.  It is the BEST EVER blend I ever had, and it was a place where we just stopped because I said “let’s stop here” as we drove past it on the road.

1/2 clove minced garlic

More olive oil

Mix olive oil, garlic and oil together with a fork.  Let sit for a while.

Pat your fish dry if it is very wet.  Coat each side with the herb mixture.

Drizzle with some more olive oil, and cook in oven for 20 minutes.  Take out and cover with tin foil for at least 5 minutes.

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

Char Sui (Chinese Barbecue Pork)

IMG_1282

PACKAGED MARINADE VS HOMEMADE MARINADE

A Scientific Experiment that Resulted in Me Eating A Lot of Pork

Whilst looking at wonderful recipes, I came across one for Char Sui, or Chinese BBQ Pork.  It was on a site called culinarychronicles, and was crossposted on another site called mamabatesmotel.

I have one of those brains that can latch on to something like a Border Collie focuses on sheep.  Intense concentration.  Unwavering devotion to a cause, principle, or course of action.  It is in those beautiful moments that everything seems to just…flow in a river of excitement and anticipation.

In the case of trying a new recipe, it’s mouth watering anticipation.

And WOW, did I want to try to make char sui.

And travel to multiple Asian countries to purchase it from market stalls and street vendors.  To use it as filling in puffy steamed buns and on a kebab.  Could I surprise my Chinese friend with a hunk of it just to see what she thought?  Would it do?

Could I make a gluten free version?  Could I get the red color without using food coloring? Could I make a decent version using items I already have in my pantry?

Off I went to the store to pick up organic, pasture raised pork shoulder.  Expensive yes, but besides the taste which is so much better, it has elevated levels of healthy fats that can withstand high cooking temperatures without breaking down.  Not fed antibiotics, not fed GMO corn and soybeans, not fed various waste products.  And of course, raised in a much more humane and ethical manner which is very important.  Especially for an animal lover and former vegetarian like me, who simply has a body that NEEDS animal products, especially the fat.

But I digress.

Once I had the pork shoulder, lo and behold, I came across beet powder for a natural food coloring, and a gluten free hoisin sauce.

Score!

And from there I discovered a seasoning packet with no listed gluten sources AND all natural coloring, no artificial red food dye.  And it was the last packet.

Scoredy Score SCORE!

The seasoning packet directions are simple and take just seconds to prepare.  Open packet, dissolve in water, and pour over meat.  Badabing badabang, done.

Homemade is not too much longer but goes into the minutes range.  I had sake (yes, I know it’s not Chinese but I’m using what I have), molasses and sorghum, amino acids, a red wine vinegar, chili paste, Chinese 5 Spice, garlic, ginger, clam juice.  Close enough.

How would it work out?  Here are the two versions side by side as they are starting to marinate.  As you can see, the packaged version on the left has a much brighter red color.  Maybe because it contains carmine – a natural dye that is made from bugs.

IMG_1274

Here is a taste test after three hours of marinating.  The top is the packaged, and the bottom is the homemade.  It’s cooked at 450 F for 20 minutes in the oven, and then broiled for about a minute or so total.  They weren’t glazed before broiling.  I would like to say that the only reason I cooked it after three hours was in the interest of science.  Because the seasoning packet had 2-3 hours of marinating in the directions.  But that’s an excuse.  I just couldn’t wait to try it.

IMG_1278

I would say that there wasn’t a HUGE amount of difference between the 2 versions at this point.  There was a faint…oh…metallic aftertaste to the packaged version, but it was very mild and hardly noticeable.

Back they went into the fridge to finish up properly.

And the results of the experiment?  Besides eating a lot of charred hunks of pork?

  1. neither version had that appealing red ring of color that you see in pictures, but the packaged version had an overall brighter reddish hue, whereas the homemade was a deeper red.
  2. the packaged version STILL had a slightly metallic taste, but the flavor was good
  3. the homemade version tasted much better when  eaten side by side. After the full day of marinating you could tell the difference.
  4. I would recommend taking some of the marinating mixture, adding some hoisin and honey, and reducing it on the stove.  You can brush the hot mixture on the top of the meat right when it comes out from under the broiler.  I didn’t do this, but will next time.  That way it will have a nice, shiny, sticky glaze.

This was fun to make and eat!  I served an Asian cabbage slaw with it, and that recipe will be shared in a few days.  It’s a recipe familiar to most Americans (except that I use Miso) but almost non existent in Europe, which is a pity because it is SO GOOD, and cabbage is perfect for digesting pork.

Sauce

For 2 – 2 1/2 pounds pork shoulder cut into 1 1/2 wide strips

4 T gluten free Hoisin

4 T Bragg’s Amino Acids (tastes like soy sauce)

4 T Sake

2 T Molasses

2 T Sorghum

2 t gluten free chili paste

2 t Chinese 5 Spice

2 t clam juice (gluten free, because it says so on the jar)

2 t beetroot powder

2 t minced ginger

2 t minced garlic

2 T red wine vinegar (or use the vinegar you have)

2 T water

Whisk together sauce ingredients and pour over meat.  Marinate overnight or 24 hours.

Preheat oven to 450F

Line a pan with aluminum foil to catch drippings and put an oven safe rack on top of the foil.  Place pork strips on the rack – and cook for 20 minutes total, flipping after 10.

Remove from oven and turn broiler to high.

Remove pork from cooking rack and place directly on the pan.  Brush well with the marinade juices.

Broil for about 30 – 45 seconds, remove from oven and quickly flip, then return for another 30 seconds or so.  Do NOT leave the oven unattended. 30 seconds only seems like a long time when you’re waiting for water to boil.  When you’re broiling meat in the oven it goes extremely fast and your meat could burn.

Remove from oven and let sit for a little bit to let the juices redistribute before serving.

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

Three Sisters Vegetable Medley and Maple Glazed Scallops

IMG_1268

Many Native American tribes planted a crop called “The Three Sisters”.  Consisting of grain corn, beans, and winter squash, all could be stored and eaten later as a nutritious and protein rich meal.

This companion planting was as beneficial to the soil as it was to the body.  The sturdy, upright corn stalks provided a trellis for the bean vines to climb upwards, and the nitrogen producing bacteria on the roots of the bean plants fueled the growth of the corn.  The large leaves of the rambling squash vines provided moisture retention and shade to the soil during the hot summer afternoons.

This recipe uses canned items, but if you wanted to get really authentic you could use hominy, polenta, or grits instead of the sweet corn.  All of those are grain corns.  Dried beans are also more authentic, as they have fully developed their protein structure.

String beans, sweet corn, and summer squash don’t really count as “The Three Sisters”, but they do taste good together.

*Fun Fact – Is corn a vegetable, grain, or a fruit?

It depends on when you eat it.  Corn is a type of grass – a cereal grass.  Meaning that you can eat the seeds (dried corn kernels) as a grain.  When you eat sweet corn, it’s considered a vegetable because the kernels are tender and immature.  Botanically, the kernels are the “fruit” or seeds of the grass.  So there you have it!

Maple Glazed Scallops  (These only take about 5 minutes to cook, so save for last)

6 scallops, pat dry, and season with garlic salt and pepper

2 T butter

2 T water

2 T maple syrup

Heat a cast iron skillet to medium.  Make sure it’s nice and hot.  Mix water and maple syrup together.  Add butter to the pan, and once it’s browned, gently lay your scallops in the pan.  Cook for 2 minutes without moving the scallops around.  Flip, and cook for another minute.  Add the water and maple syrup, and let cook for another minute.  Transfer to plate.  Pour liquid (it will have cooked down very quickly) over scallops.

Three Sisters Medley

1 C Cannellini beans (canned)

1 C sweet corn (canned)

1 C roasted butternut squash, diced

1 C baby spinach, rough chopped

1 C red bell pepper, diced

1 green onion, sliced very thin

1/4 cube vegetable bouillon, crumbled

1 T nutritional yeast

1 T crushed dried sage

1 big pinch red pepper flakes

1/4 C heavy cream

1/4 C marscapone

2 slices thick cut bacon, fried and chopped.  Reserve bacon fat.

salt and pepper to taste

Combine beans, corn, squash, bouillon, yeast, sage, pepper flakes, and cream in a bowl.  Heat skillet to medium low and cook red pepper and green onion in bacon drippings until onion is translucent and peppers are getting soft.  Pour in the vegetable medley, stir, and when cream hits a boil add the chopped spinach.  Once the spinach starts to wilt, stir in marscapone.  When the marscapone is fully melted, reduce heat to simmer and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Serve the scallops on top of the Three Sisters Medley, and top with bacon and the maple juices from the scallop pan!

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

 

 

 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Red Grapes and Pine Nuts

IMG_1186

Antioxidants, fiber (or should I spell it “fibre” just to shake things up a bit), vitamins and minerals galore, toasty, crunchy, and pops of sweet.

Top with crumbled bacon if you would like, or better yet, serve with sausage.  It’s especially good with Italian style sausage, and if you’ve never had sausages and grapes for supper, then you’re missing out.

The only thing this picture is missing is the sprouts and the pine nuts!

IMG_0864

Brussels Sprouts are a variety of cabbage that grows on a stalk, and the sprout itself is actually a “bud”, like a flower bud.  They’re not “baby cabbages” like I once thought, but an actual type that originally came from the Mediterranean region and then moved north through Europe.

One cup of these sprouts has 120% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C.  And you know what my favorite dessert is to have after this meal?

A couple of mandarin oranges.  More Vitamin C.  And the other part of a good dessert?  The almost forgotten and lesser known Vitamin C – Conversation.  

This entire meal can be on the table in about 30 minutes, leaving plenty of time to enjoy each others company.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Red Grapes and Pine Nuts

1/2 pound Brussels Sprouts, sliced in 1/2 lengthwise through the core

olive oil

salt, pepper, garlic powder, red pepper flakes

1/2 C red grapes, sliced in 1/2

2 t pine nuts

Iron skillet

Preheat oven to 400F.  In a small mixing bowl, drizzle some olive oil over the sprouts and add in the seasonings.  I don’t measure.  Mix to make sure everything is coated and then put into your skillet.  Don’t crowd them too much or they’ll steam instead of roast.  Set timer for 15 minutes.

Take out pan and flip the sprouts.  Add the grapes and nuts to the pan.  Return to oven for 5 minutes.

Transfer to plate immediately so those little nuts don’t get too brown!  Top with bacon, or some additional salt and pepper and a drizzle of good olive oil.

 

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00

African Peanut Chicken Soup

IMG_1158

I like fancy food – a lot, but I also like comfort food – a lot.  This recipe definitely falls into the comfort food category.  It also falls into the really good and healthy for you category.

It would take pages to write down all of the benefits that you can get from curry powder alone, and this recipe has almost a 1/4 cup of it.  Surprisingly it doesn’t taste like an overwhelming curry, but your body sure recognizes how good it is and starts to use it right away.

If there was one benefit that really stands out, it would be anti-inflammatory.  But even that is not enough.  These ingredients are strongly anti-cancer and even guard against cognitive malfunctions such as alzheimers.  Your liver will thank you too, because it’s great for clearing out congestion, which is pretty common in the cold winter months.

Convert it easily to a meatless (and vegan) version by substituting chickpeas and roasted cauliflower for the chicken.  A good quality vegetable broth made with carrots or squash will also provide a similar richness as the chicken broth.  Go even further, and get even more nutrition by adding some miso to the finished version.  You wont have to cook it as long, so just adjust your time.

I feel really good after eating this dish, and I know you will too!

 

African Peanut Chicken Soup

1-2 T coconut oil

2 chicken thighs (bone in, with skin)

1 yam, diced

1/2 C onion, minced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1  jalapeño pepper, diced, no seeds (can use a different kind of pepper if you would like)

1 T grated ginger

1 smoked kipper, minced (or you can use a smoked fish that you just put in the pot while cooking and then pull out)

3 T curry powder (no salt)

pinch sugar

pinch hot pepper flakes

1 bay leaf

1 quart low sodium chicken broth (I add additional bone broth concentrate for flavor and nutrition)

1 C creamy peanut butter

1 14.5 oz can fire roasted tomatoes, drained

1 C coconut cream

salt and pepper

Heat up your dutch oven to medium low, and add the coconut oil.  Salt and pepper your chicken thighs and brown on each side.  Stir in the yams, garlic, onion, pepper and curry powder with a pinch of salt. Cover and cook for about 5 minutes or so.

Stir in the chicken broth, peanut butter and tomatoes.  Add the bay leaf and sugar, cover, and simmer for about an hour.  Pull out the chicken thighs and once they are cool enough to handle, shred the meat and finely mince the skin. Return them to the pot and stir in the coconut cream.  Add a good amount of black pepper, and then taste to see if it needs more salt.

Let cook for another 20 minutes to half hour, but don’t let it boil.  It should be hot, but not boiling.

Serve with crushed peanuts on top and raw pumpkin seeds or cilantro.

*options: you can make this a stew by reducing the amount of broth or by adding additional chicken thighs which can be served whole over a bed of rice*

Invest

Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

$1.00