Herbes de Provence Cod

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It has been a while since I have posted.  There are a lot of reasons why, but if I have to look deeply at myself, a big part of it is because I thought:

What I ate is not post worthy

I’m experimenting a lot, and the recipes are good, but

Not post worthy

People like what I cooked, say they love it, but can it be replicated?  Can anyone do it?  Anywhere?

Not worthy

Wow.

Psalm 139:14 says

I will praise you; for I am fearfully (gloriously) and wonderfully made: marvelous are thy works; and THAT my soul knoweth right well.

That’s US.  Who we are, when we agree with who God says we are.

So today, I made some fish.  And it was good. So I’m posting it.  Not because it’s fancy, takes a lot of technique, or ticks any of the current dietary things, or is post worthy, but because it was good, and after eating it, I FELT good, and a cloud lifted from my brain.

Not only that, but afterwards I ate the leftovers of a recipe I was working on that is the

PERFECT DESSERT for this meal.  I’m so excited again to work on that one, because somehow, in the days when I couldn’t figure out what to post…it was all coming together in a glorious and wonderful way.  A little bit of research showed, that when you put certain foods together, you actually assimilate all of the nutrients and AMP UP the nutritional value.

Seriously?

It’s true!

The dessert that I have been working on is super good, and fits completely with the fish I made tonight, it just needs a few tweaks and twiggles.  I made up the word twiggles but feel free to use it.

This recipe is for ONE.  Just multiply the ingredients if someone else is eating with you.

You start by laying very thinly sliced potatoes, carrots, and a little bit of onion in a cast iron pan that was heated to med low, and had a small amount of olive oil spread on the bottom.  I salted all the veg except the onion, and let the liquids come out.  Then rinsed them and patted them dry before putting them in the pan.  Some of the starch will come out of the potatoes.

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Then I laid the cod on top of the potatoes.  The cod was seasoned with garlic, herbes de provence, olive oil, and some pink salt.  I topped it with some thin sliced lemon, and drizzled some more olive oil over it all.

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After 10 minutes in a 350 F oven, I took it out and stirred up all the vegetables around the fish.

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Another 10 minutes in the oven, take out, stir the vegetables again, and cover in tin foil.  It should sit for at least 5 minutes covered by the foil tent.

I’ll do the first picture again, because all I do many times is top with a chiffonade of lettuce.  Even if it’s not just you eating, it’s fun to set out salt and pepper that has to be ground, and some olive oil.  That way everyone gets interactive with the food, even if someone else cooked it. There is always going to be someone who wants to put some hot pepper on it, so put that out also.  Anyway, have fun!

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Herbes de Provence Cod

1 piece cod approx 6 oz (I used a frozen at sea piece)

2 T good olive oil

1 T Herbes de Provence ( I used a blend from a place called gaec le frigoulet – but I can’t find a website.  It is the BEST EVER blend I ever had, and it was a place where we just stopped because I said “let’s stop here” as we drove past it on the road.

1/2 clove minced garlic

More olive oil

Mix olive oil, garlic and oil together with a fork.  Let sit for a while.

Pat your fish dry if it is very wet.  Coat each side with the herb mixture.

Drizzle with some more olive oil, and cook in oven for 20 minutes.  Take out and cover with tin foil for at least 5 minutes.

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Gram’s Crepes

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I loved to wake up in the morning and discover that my Grandma had been making crepes.  They were, and still are my favorite breakfast.  Nothing fancy, just warm crepes spread with a choice of different jellies and jams.  For me, orange marmalade is the absolute perfect filling for such a delectable pancake.

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My Grandmother just passed away 2 days ago – 2 short weeks before her 95th birthday.  I have a bunch of recipes that she shared with my Mother and I.  All carefully typed out, with handwritten messages in the margins.

Many of the recipes have tips for making them with limited ingredients – the kinds of ingredients you would find on a military base at the “commissary”.  Today there is quite a wide variety of items, but that wasn’t always the case long ago, so sometimes you had to get creative.

She had been a Drill Sergeant in the Marines during WWII while my Grandfather was flying in the Pacific for the Army Air Corps – which later became the Airforce.  She wasn’t a cuddly Grandma, in case you’re wondering what kind of Grandma a Drill Sergeant is.

 

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She was a woman who’s body had been strengthened and made flexible by years of dance training in her youth and young adult years.  In the larger picture below, she is dancing at about the age of 12 or so while the famous composer Liberace is playing piano.  Both grew up in West Allis Wisconsin – a small working class suburb of the larger working class city of Milwaukee.  In the smaller picture, she is stretching while stationed at Camp LeJeune.

As long as I knew her, she spent every night stretching to keep her body in health.  Every night.  Usually after swimming her 50 laps in the pool.  Oftentimes naked, which is why I never joined her.  I wasn’t about to go swimming with my naked Grandma, so I swam during the day.

 

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And because she only slept for about 4-5 hours every evening, she would go to bed at midnight, and be up by 4:30 or 5 to make crepes . That way they would be ready by the time us kids woke up in the morning.

Ha!  No, not really!  She didn’t actually get up that early just to make crepes.  She just didn’t sleep very much.  But I’ll tell you, I was always so excited when I would walk out and see all the assorted jams on that table, each neatly spooned into small dishes on a lazy suzan. It meant we were having crepes!

I love you Grandma, and I’ll be sharing more of yours and Grandpa’s recipes in the future.  And I apologize – you never wanted to be called “Grandma” because you decided that was only for “old people”.  So almost everything you signed was “Grams”.

This post is in honor of you Grams.

Much love,

Christina

Gram’s Crepes (makes about 12 small crepes)

3 large eggs

1 C whole milk

1 Cup All Purpose flour (I’ve made great gluten free crepes with alternative flours)

3 T melted butter + more butter for the pan

Combine eggs, milk and flour in a mixing bowl using a handheld mixer or blender.  Or…do it the old fashioned way – with muscles and a whisk.  Add melted butter.  Refrigerate overnight ideally, or for at least an hour or more.  Enough time to let the flour absorb the liquid.  This makes it easy to cook the crepes without tearing them, and they actually cook a bit more quickly.

I no longer have a crepe pan, but actually prefer my “crepe assembly line method”.  Small nonstick pan on one burner.  Larger nonstick pan on a different burner.  Wooden board for a quick cool down, and a serving plate kept warm in the oven at 200 F.

Preheat small pan to med low, and large pan to a bit under that.  Add a small amount of butter to the small pan, and pour in approximately 1/4 C of batter, quickly swirling to make an even, thin pancake.  Cook for about 1-2 minutes until set.  Gently loosen the edges – it should pop right out if the flour absorbed enough of the liquid.  Flip onto the larger pan, and cook for just a bit – usually less than a minute. Repeat process with smaller pan.

Remove crepe from larger pan and set on wooden cutting board.  This helps when you are making a pile of them to serve all at once.  It brings down the moisture content just a bit so they don’t stick together.

Flip 1/2 done crepe onto larger pan, and put the finished crepe from the board on your serving dish in the warm oven.

Repeat process, adding butter if needed to the smaller pan.  Small pan, big pan, wooden board, oven.  Small pan, big pan, wooden board, oven.  This ends up going very quickly once you do it assembly line style!

Serve with different jellies, jams, or fresh fruit, and watch your family smile!

 

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Your investment/donation pays for every day living costs and keeps the blog ad free! I appreciate everything no matter how big or small. I recommend purchasing 1 million items. Haven’t tested if the system is capable of that.

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